FAQs

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Q?

How do I open the Siberian honey?

A.

There are two very simple ways to open our Siberian honey:

  1. Just heat the bee wax a little with a lighter around the cover and it will open easily.
  2. To scrub out the bee wax with a knife around the cover and pull out the cover by holding for small handle in the middle.

Q?

Is your honey processed or pasteurized? 

A.

No, Siberian honey is not processed, filtered, heated or pasteurized; ours is 100% pure, raw and natural honey (unpasteurized). Raw honey will retain its natural sweet, full bodied flavor. If you compare it to processed honey, you'll immediately notice the difference. 

Q?

Does honey have any health benefits? 

A.

Yes! Honey is more than just a sweetener! There are many health benefits of honey and it has a long history of use as a "medicine." Eating honey has a stabilizing effect on our body's blood sugar levels and does not stimulate as rapid insulin production as sucrose (table sugar) or glucose. Honey has an antibacterial effect and inhibits the growth of many bacteria strains, including the bacteria responsible for ulcers. Honey has been used in topical dressings to treat infected surgical wounds, burns, and skin grafts. Honey significantly increases antioxidant levels in the blood while improving immune system activity. A tablespoon or more of honey consumed at bedtime promotes natural restorative sleep by preventing metabolic stress due to depleted liver glycogen stores. Without metabolic stress during rest, stress hormones are not released, maximum fat-burning during rest is possible, and natural restoration of body tissues and immune system functions occurs naturally. Honey, when consumed on a regular basis, can actually help with some allergies. These health benefits and more are the same for all unpasteurized honey including liquid, creamed, crystalized and honey comb.  

HONEY AND YOUR HEALTH

Clinical studies have shown that honey enhances the growth of healthful bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract. The effect of honey was similar to that of commercial FOS, GOS and insulin. Sweeteners other than honey did not appear to have an effect on stimulating bifidobacteria growth.

  1. Honey can enhance the growth of acid production of human Bifidobacterium ss. Journal of Food Protection. 2002; 65(1); 214-8
  2. Honey enhances the production of lactic acid from Bifidobacteria, Journal of Food Science, 2001;66(3): 478-481

Doctors have used raw honey to treat seasonal allergies since it contains the pollen that causes 90% of the allergies in the first place. By eating a teaspoon daily the patient builds up an immunity. Dr. William Peterson, The Bee Hive Bible pp. 127-130

SPEED HEALING WITH HONEY

The use of honey as a wound dressing goes back to ancient times and has now been “rediscovered’ by modern medicine, according to Dr. Peter Molan of the University of Waikato, New Zealand. The antibacterial properties of honey may help clear infection in wounds, and the anti-inflammatory action of honey may reduce pain and may improve circulation which hastens the healing process. According to Dr. Molan, “Honey stimulated the re-growth of tissue involved in healing, making healing faster and reducing scarring”. The credit goes to honey’s rich supply of natural antibiotics and enzymes.

In one study 87% of patients with honey coated burns healed completely within two weeks, compared to just 10% of those treated with a standard Rx, silver sulfadiazine. Follow up research showed the honey destroyed 100% of the bacteria that cause infections.

  1. Honey in the Treatment of Wounds and Burns, American Journal of Dermatology, 2001,Vol. 2 No. 1, pp.13-19
  2. Honey is Effective in the Treatment of Post Surgical Wounds, Acta Paedatr. 1998 Apr; 87(4); 429-32
  3. Honey’s Ability To Stimulate Inflammatory Cytokine Production From Monocytes May Help Explain Its Wound Healing Capacity, Cytokine. 2003 Mar 7; 21

Q?

Is Siberian Honey Gluten Free?

A.

Siberian Honey does not contain gluten. Honey is a wholesome product made by honey bees from the nectar of various flowers. The nectar, from which the honey is produced, does not contain any gluten.  It is a pure product with no additives. Gluten comes from wheat, rye, barley & oats. 

Q?

How should I store my honey?

A.

Honey can be stored pretty much anywhere at any temperature however different temperatures can cause it to crystalize (if it is cold) or liquefy (if it is hot). It is one of the few products in the world that never goes bad, due to its unique chemical composition. We recommend storing your honey at room temperature whenever possible to stop it from crystalizing due to cold temperatures or liquefying due to hot temperatures. 

Q?

Should individuals with diabetes eat honey? 

A.

Honey is the sweetener of choice for diabetics. Honey actually stabilizes blood sugar and lowers HbA1c levels, something refined sugar and high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) cannot do. After ingestion, honey is converted directly into liver glycogen and does not result in the formation of triglycerides (fatty acids) as typically occurs after the consumption of large amounts of HFCS and sucrose found in the average American diet. Honey does not trigger an immediate or excessive insulin release which results from the consumption of most artificial sweeteners, and thus does not promote fat production, fat storage, and weight gain commonly associated with the use of these products. 

Q?

Is your honey containing GMO?

A.

No, our Siberian honey is Pesticide, Antibiotic & GMO FREE.

Q?

Is eating honey good for my allergies?

A.

It has been reported that eating local honey helps with allergies, but recent studies in Great Britain have shown that eating raw honey from anywhere helps even more.

Q?

Is there any added sugar in honey?

A.

Honey, It's Only Pure if There's No Added Sugar or Corn Syrup. Honey mixed with sugar might be sweet, but it is not "honey." Food companies and other producers who add sweeteners to honey have to alert consumers by labeling their products as a "blend". 

Q?

Is honey vegan?

A.

The simplest reason why honey isn't vegan is by definition. The term vegan was coined by Donald Watson in 1944 and was defined as follows: Veganism is a way of living which excludes all forms of exploitation of, and cruelty to, the animal kingdom, and includes a reverence for life. 

Q?

Why do different honey varieties have different colors and tastes?

A.

No two nectar sources have the same chemistry. They have different combinations of sugars, minerals and enzymes. For example, very dark honeys, such as buckwheat or tulip poplar, have a high mineral content. This gives them their color and is also considered desirable by health food experts.

Q?

What is the role of pollen in honey?

A.

Honey is made by honey bees from the nectar of flowers and plants, not pollen. Pollen is actually an accidental guest in honey, brought back by the bee as a source of food for baby bees (the “brood”), or incidentally introduced into the honey through other means, such as during the extraction process. Pollen in honey is sometimes analyzed to help determine the primary floral source. The amount of pollen in honey is minuscule and not enough to impact the nutrient value of honey. Honey is still honey, even without pollen. 

Q?

Is Siberian honey 100% pure honey?

A.

Yes, all Siberian honey is 100% pure natural honey with no additives! In fact, we conduct tests to ensure the purity of our honey. 

Q?

What is “raw” honey?

A.

While there is no official U.S. federal definition of raw honey, the National Honey Board defines raw honey as “honey as it exists in the beehive or as obtained by extraction, settling or straining without adding heat.”  This definition does not have any legal authority, but is provided to help in the understanding of honey and honey terms.

Raw honey is natural, unpasteurized honey, nothing added or taken away. It is what bees produce in the hive. It is ready to eat after it has been extracted and run through a fine sieve to remove foreign particles that may have found their way into the honey in the extracting process (such as bee parts, pollen and wax). All pure unpasteurized honey is raw honey. Raw honey or pure honey is not pasteurized, modified or adulterated in any way before it is packaged and sold.

Q?

Is honey safe for infants?

A.

As with any raw, unprocessed foods, honey is not recommended for infants whose immune systems are not fully developed, a process that occurs usually in the first year.  Therefore it is not recommended for children under one year of age.

Q?

Does honey spoil or go bad?

A.

As long as it is unpasteurized, no. Honey stored in sealed containers can remain stable for decades and even centuries! However, honey is susceptible to physical and chemical changes during storage; it tends to darken and lose its aroma and flavor or crystallize.

Q?

How do bees pollinate plants?

A.

As bees travel from blossom to blossom in search of nectar, they brush against the pollen-bearing parts of a flower (anther or stamen) and pick up pollen. When the honey bee goes to another flower for more food, some of the pollen from the first flower sticks to the second flower. In this way, the flowers are pollinated. Almonds, apples, avocados, blueberries, cantaloupes, cherries, cranberries, cucumbers, sunflowers, watermelon and many other crops all benefit from honey bees for pollination.

Q?

Is it OK to eat honey while pregnant or nursing?

A.

Yes.

Q?

How do bees make honey?

A.

Honey is the sweet fluid produced by honey bees from the nectar of flowers. Worker honey bees transform the floral nectar that they gather into honey by adding enzymes to the nectar and reducing the moisture.

Q?

Is raw honey more nutritious than processed or filtered honey?

A.

While there is no official U.S. federal definition of “raw” honey, it generally means honey that has not been heated or filtered. According to the FDA, “nutritious” can be used in reference to the diet as a whole, not an individual food. Nevertheless, we often see or hear claims that raw honey is “more nutritious” or “better for you,” primarily because raw honey may contain small amounts of pollen grains that are often removed during processing or filtering.

Honey is produced by honey bees from the nectar of plants, not pollen.  Pollen occurs only incidentally in honey. The amount of pollen in honey is miniscule and not enough to impact the nutrient value of honey.  According to Dr. Lutz Elflein, a honey analysis expert with an international food laboratory, the amount of pollen in honey ranges from about 0.1 to 0.4%.   Similarly, a 2004 study by the Australian government found the percentage of dry weight canola pollen in 32 Australian canola honey samples ranged from 0.15% to 0.443%.

A 2012 study by the National Honey Board analyzed vitamins, minerals and antioxidant levels in raw and processed honey.  The study showed that processing significantly reduced the pollen content of the honey, but did not affect the nutrient content or antioxidant activity, leading the researchers to conclude that the micronutrient profile of honey is not associated with its pollen content and is not affected by commercial processing.  The 2012 study and abstract with statistical analysis was presented at the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology (FASEB) Conference in Boston April 20-24, 2013.

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